Avocados – A Brief Profile Plus a Recipe Roundup

Avocados – A Brief Profile Plus a Recipe Roundup

Native to Central America and Mexico, avocados are the green skinned, pear shaped fruits from the Lauraceae plant family. There are three main types of avocados in the world – the Mexican, the Guatemalan and the West Indian. From those three types, thousands of different varieties are produced, however, in the United States, the most popular variety is the Hass. Also known as the Alligator Pear and Zaboca in many parts of the world, the fruit has been dubbed, one of the healthiest crops available.

Avocados are an excellent source for protein, fiber, potassium, copper, lutein, beta carotene, lycopene and zinc. They are also rich in vitamins E, C, K, and B6. When consumed regularly, avocados have the ability to aid in the metabolic process while also strengthening the immune system. They can fight free radicals and also cut down on sick-time. The fruit is also a natural anti-inflammatory agent, a cancer cell fighter, a blood sugar balancer and a promoter of heart and eye health. In addition to its inwardly benefits, avocados are also a valuable beauty aid – they have been used for centuries in face masks, hair conditioners to help strengthen hair follicles, nourish the skin, absorb excess oils, shrink pores and soften age spots.

The biggest quarrel with avocado is their rapid oxidization – they become brown and loose its appeal soon after it is cut, nevertheless, the folks over at Making it Home has a simple tip for remedying this annoyance. To reap the most value from avocados, chose from varieties that were grown organically. Also, be mindful that they are a high calorie food: the typical avocado is about 230 calories and may cause weight gain if you over-consume.